The Holotropic Mind

 

The Holotropic MindThe Three Levels of Human Consciousness, With Hal Zina Bennett, New York: HarperCollins, 1993.

In The Holotropic Mind Stanislav Grof exposes his vision of a holographic universe, and he summons convincing amounts of data and evidence for his view. Grof’s contribution is important especially right now as the holographic view of the universe is one of several ‘theories of everything’ or integrative visions that actually link back to ancient holistic science traditions.

Grof further references current research, thus blending ancient and new cutting-edge science into something like a total synthesis.

With good reason and convincing arguments, he refers to David Bohm’s theory of a constantly unfolding universe as one of the first holistic science concepts in modern times:

For Bohm, holographic theory illustrates his idea that energy, light, and matter are composed of interference patterns that carry information about all of the other waves of light, energy, and matter that they have directly or indirectly contacted. Thus, each part of energy and matter represents a microcosm that enfolds the whole./10

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Life After Death

 

Life After DeathThe Book of Answers, London: Rider, 2006.

Life After Death is one of Deepak Chopra’s best books. I am talking about this specific edition that he published with Rider in London, not about the later version entitled Life after Death: The Burden of Proof, that he published in the USA.

What makes the strength of the present edition is that designers and the publisher really worked well to bring over Chopra’s poetic content to the distinguished reader. For this book is not just scientific in the modern sense of the word; it is scientific within the oldest traditions of the world, and among them the tradition Chopra himself originates from, the wistful Vedic tradition of India. In this sense, the book is an artful composition of poetic teaching tales and scientific text interwoven in a fantastic poetic tale.

I do not presently know an author who could do such a fusion without losing his style, and get into popular science jargon.  Continue reading

What the Bleep Do We Know!?

 

What the Bleep Do We Know!? Rabbit Hole Quantum EditionDown the Rabbit Hole Quantum Edition, 20th Century Fox, 2006 (3 DVD Set).

What the Bleep Do We Know!? by William Arntz & Betsy Chasse was a companion for me over months without end. It was the most important documentary I have ever seen.

Life is complexity. Looking at it through the eyes of native peoples, the eyes of Albert Einstein, or the eyes of quantum physicists hardly makes a difference. Actually, the difference is one of precision. Most native tribes do not know much about the subatomic world, yet they know about uncertainty and nonlocality. They do not only know about it, but actively use these laws for connecting with the quantum field.

Most native shamans can be at two locations at the same time, they can relocate instantly, and travel back and forth in time. They do this not for fancy or as a pastime, but for healing people, for doing something useful to a community. And the field responds. Quantum physics teaches us that this is exactly how electrons behave, and electrons are in touch with the base layer of the universe, that is, the quantum vacuum, the level of the Planck scale.

In this review I would like to elucidate and review in some detail what scientists are saying in the movie What the Bleep Do We Know!? My idea is that, given the complexity of the subject, it may not suffice to watch the movie once or twice to really understand what is being said in the film. It is for this reason that I found the idea useful to just typescript some of the most interesting interviews. And I made the discovery that, although I have watched the movie, and even the complete Rabbit Hole Quantum Edition, several times, I got a more complete understanding of the various subjects treated in the movie only once I wrote interviews down word by word, and phrase by phrase. Continue reading

The Holographic Universe

 

The Holographic UniverseNew York: Harper Perennial, 1992.

The Holographic Universe by Michael Talbot is an extraordinary book, and a captivating read from the first to the last page. Not only has this book merited more than five stars, it merits both a literary prize and a distinction for exemplary scientific research. As the author has already passed over into greater life dimensions, these are posthumous laurels. But my recognition of the author’s genius, his motivation, his purity, and his literary and spiritual maturity is real.

The book has been a true companion for me, and it accompanied me on all trips over weeks. To begin with, the author has not just delivered an extensive study on the vast realm of psychic phenomena, he also has consulted personally a number of researchers he refers in his book. As Talbot revealed in a few notes, he had himself strong psychic abilities and was psychic already as a child. This may explain in part his participatory experience as a scientist and his fundamental understanding of the topics at stake.

Talbot makes a strong point for the holographic nature of the universe and of psychic experiences in general, and I can virtually not see how his theory can be refuted, so well-founded it appears. An important point of departure, just as in Lynne McTaggart’s startling book The Field, is the acknowledgment of a plenum where mechanistic science claims to find a vacuum:

Space is not empty. It is full, a plenum as opposed to a vacuum, and is the ground for the existence of everything, including ourselves./51

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Entangled Minds

 

ExEntangled Mindstrasensory Experiences in a Quantum Reality, New York: Paraview Pocket Books, 2006.

To be frank and straight right at the start, I find this book by Dean Radin much more interesting than his first book, The Conscious Universe, but this has to do with the simple fact that I am researching on these matters since two decades already; for me, the basic proof is since long established. However, I am well aware that such is not the case with the lay public, and thus I would recommend The Conscious Universe to those who are skeptical, or who are so bare of knowledge of psychic phenomena that they need to begin with Adam and Eve.

I shall first make some general remarks about the book, and then focus on Chapter 2 entitled Naked Psi, which deals for the most part with the highly intriguing premonitions of the September 11, 2001 events. Let us first ask, what is entanglement? Continue reading

Science and the Reenchantment of the Cosmos

 

Science and the Reenchantment of the CosmosThe Rise of the Integral Vision of Reality, Rochester: Inner Traditions, 2006.

The present is a sampler, not completely authored, but edited by Ervin Laszlo. But that’s surely not a disadvantage. The book starts with a statement that really made me happy. I have never believed in the big bang theory, as this theory is not in accordance with the principle of smooth continuity that can be observed in all of nature.

I believe that there was never a beginning of life, and that there will never be an end. We know perhaps more about the future of our galaxies, we know about the folding back of the universe upon itself, which can be seen both as end and a new beginning, both as death and as a new birth. For in nature, nothing ever dies without something else becoming manifest. So with this natural principle in mind, there can logically not be a single timelined event called big bang. It’s a typical assumption of modern-day scientists that betrays their hopelessly linear thinking. Continue reading

Science and the Akashic Field

 

An Integral Theory of Everything, Rochester: Inner Traditions, 2004.Science and the Akashic Field

Science and the Akashic Field by Ervin Laszlo is after the books of Paracelsus, Mesmer, Reichenbach, Reich, Burr, Lakhovsky, Capra, Emoto, Hunt and Sheldrake the most important book I have read on the integration of the energy paradigm—associated with the perennial notion of the ‘ether’— into the heart of modern science.

Deepak Chopra, M.D. wrote about this book:  ‘The most brilliant, comprehensive, and intellectually satisfying integral theory of everything that I have ever read.’

The author introduces the book with the following elucidation that I think is worth to be quoted in its integrality:

Akasha (â · kâ · sha) is a Sanskrit world meaning ‘ether’: all-pervasive space. Originally signifying ‘radiation’ or ‘brilliance’ in Indian philosophy akasha was considered the first and most fundamental of the five elements – the others being vata (air), agni (fire), ap (water), and prithivi (earth). Akasha embraces the properties of all five elements: it is the womb from which everything we perceive with our senses has emerged and into which everything will ultimately re-descend. The Akashic Record (also called The Akashic Chronicle) is the enduring record of all that happens, and has ever happened, in space and time.

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