Shaman, Healer, Sage

 

Shaman, Healer, SageHow to Heal Yourself and Others with the Energy Medicine of the Americas, New York: Harmony Books, 2000.

Shaman, Healer, Sage is perhaps Alberto Villoldo’s best book. It was anyway the book that made him famous, a real bestseller. It has given me an ultimate peak of reading enjoyment and illumination, and it has also emotionally touched me.

The author comes over in this book as a really honest, competent, emotionally mature, wistful and empathetic person who went through a personal transformation that only few people in these times can say to have accomplished.

This book is not only highly recommended lecture; it can perhaps be considered as one of the best books so far in the century on the issues of shamanic healing and the challenging task to render an outlandish practice of Inka shamans comprehensive to the modern mind! Continue reading

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Pleasure

 

PleasureA Creative Approach to Life, Alachua, Fl: Bioenergetic Press, 1970/2004.

In Pleasure: A Creative Approach to Life, Alexander Lowen (1910-2008) explains why pleasure is of the utmost importance for a sane and balanced life, and for both mental and physical health and wellbeing.

We are living in another era than Dr. Lowen did. The control of the state has risen about everywhere in the world, the principles of pleasure and self-regulation have largely been abandoned and replaced with a sort of compulsive morality or moralism that interpenetrates today all of life, and of political life.

Hence, the books of the late Dr. Wilhelm Reich and Dr. Alexander Lowen are the reminders today for us that the social policies in place, with their negativistic view of the human being, their tendency to declare more and more of natural behavior ‘a crime’ and to sharply control human behavior, together with the prohibition of psychedelic substances mark a turn in the wrong direction, away from nature and toward more and more structural violence and state control.  Continue reading

The Field

 

The FieldThe Quest for the Secret Force of the Universe, New York: HarperCollins, 2002.

The Field by Lynne McTaggart is the book I always wanted to read because I always wanted to write it. I always wanted to write a study that proves that all what myopic modern science excludes, exists. And here is this book. It reads almost like a thriller, so captivating it is, and the author is able to convey the complex material in understandable terms.

It is obvious that she understands what she writes about, and some of the quantum physics stuff really is not easy to grasp.

The author argues from the premise that all in our universe is interconnected, that nothing is isolated, or, as scientists say, that all is entangled. Now, when you put up such a point of departure, a lot of consequences flow out from this. Continue reading

A Practical Guide to Vibrational Medicine

 

A Practical Guide to Vibrational MedicineEnergy Healing and Spiritual Transformation, New York: HarperCollins Quill, 2001

A Practical Guide to Vibrational Medicine by Richard Gerber is an excellent book, carefully written, very well put together conceptually, while I have to put a question mark behind one conceptual matter that I will discuss further down.

Let me first comment on the general conception of the book and the author’s unique contribution to a novel subject, that only increases in importance over time. Dr. Gerber’s main quality is his detached and careful approach to a matter that really is controversial. Let us not forget that Paracelsus who was perhaps the first in our culture who came up with energy healing had to stand trial before the Inquisition.

This being said, the book is perhaps not as practical as the title suggests it to be, not as practical as for example Donna Eden’s book Energy Medicine, which I will review further down in this volume. This is because this book is conceptual in the first place, and practical in the second place, and because it’s paradigmatic, and cutting-edge in its overall perspective. It’s well practical when you consider the abundance of references and the resource section of the book that comes with pages and pages of organizations that can lead you further in your research project. But the overall style of the book is academic, which is for me not a negative characteristics at all but may be for some other folks.  Continue reading

The Hidden Messages in Water

 

The Hidden Messages in WaterNew York: Atria Books, 2004.

I learnt about Masaru Emoto’s water research in the film What The Bleep Do We Know!? It was an information that really left me speechless, and I ordered his books at once.

I will not enter here the discussion about the credibility of his research. Allegedly, his water photography technique is not meeting the standard of double-blind tests. So, I will base my book reviews strictly on quotes taken from the books, and try to check his research back with my own twenty years of bioenergy research.

This is an approach that allows me to avoid judging the controversy, or any of the positions as ‘right’ or ‘wrong,’ yet it helps to see that there is a certain probability that the memory of water is likely to reflect a certain bioenergetic functionality inherent in nature. Continue reading