The Astral Plane

 

The Astral PlaneIts Scenery, Inhabitants, and Phenomena, Kessinger Publishing Facsimile Edition, 1997, Originally Written in 1894

The Astral Plane: Its Scenery, Inhabitants and Phenomena by Charles W. Leadbeater is a quite dumbfounding account of the astral world from the perspective of a highly-developed clairvoyant. Leadbeater was not a daydreamer and high-strung delusional, but possessed a scientific mind. Judging what he wrote from the perspective of the lesser developed ‘ordinary consciousness’ would be a pitfall of perception.

When I first came in touch with theosophy, thirty years ago, by reading Helena P. Blavatsky’s Secret Doctrine and so much the more after December 1997, when I joined the Theosophical Society of Adyar in Germany e.V., I went to study the biographies of the notorious and more or less famous founders of theosophy, Blavatsky, Leadbeater, and Besant. With regard to Leadbeater this in-depth lectures reassured that he was not the high-strung and scandal-ridden Anglican bishop he was painted in the media, but a nobleman who made his life’s mission from his extraordinary gift of clairvoyance, by meticulously and systematically exploring its phenomena, building a scientific framework for explaining them in a verifiable manner. Continue reading

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The Chakras

 

The ChakrasCorrelations between Medical Science and Clairvoyant Observation, Shafica Karagulla, with Dora van Gelder Kunz, Wheaton: Quest Books, 1989.

This is an extraordinary book. I do research on the bioenergy since two decades, but I have not encountered so much information about such esoteric a subject in one single book. But I must warn the non-scientific reader: this isn’t a book for enhancing your general knowledge about the aura, and the chakras, and it is by no means a practical book, guidebook, or anything of the kind.

You got two medical practitioners here, one of which is a clairvoyant. The author herself, Shafica Karagulla, is the kind of traditional physician who writes with a lot of ‘faculty terms’, so to speak, using medical terminology all over the place. Further down, I’ll quote some examples. So think twice if you want to buy this book. For me personally, it was indispensable for my research. There are some elucidations in this book that I found earlier in my research, but only after studying tedious manuals and old hermetic writings.  Continue reading