Science and the Akashic Field

 

An Integral Theory of Everything, Rochester: Inner Traditions, 2004.Science and the Akashic Field

Science and the Akashic Field by Ervin Laszlo is after the books of Paracelsus, Mesmer, Reichenbach, Reich, Burr, Lakhovsky, Capra, Emoto, Hunt and Sheldrake the most important book I have read on the integration of the energy paradigm—associated with the perennial notion of the ‘ether’— into the heart of modern science.

Deepak Chopra, M.D. wrote about this book:  ‘The most brilliant, comprehensive, and intellectually satisfying integral theory of everything that I have ever read.’

The author introduces the book with the following elucidation that I think is worth to be quoted in its integrality:

Akasha (â · kâ · sha) is a Sanskrit world meaning ‘ether’: all-pervasive space. Originally signifying ‘radiation’ or ‘brilliance’ in Indian philosophy akasha was considered the first and most fundamental of the five elements – the others being vata (air), agni (fire), ap (water), and prithivi (earth). Akasha embraces the properties of all five elements: it is the womb from which everything we perceive with our senses has emerged and into which everything will ultimately re-descend. The Akashic Record (also called The Akashic Chronicle) is the enduring record of all that happens, and has ever happened, in space and time.

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The Secret Life of Water

 

The Secret Life of WaterNew York: Atria Books, 2005.

The Secret Life of Water, when you compare it with Masaru Emoto’s first book, The Hidden Messages in Water, is something like the scientific back office of water research.

Here, Masaru Emoto really explains what hado really is, this strange concept that seemingly was unknown in our own culture until very recently, except among natural healers and clairvoyants. Yet it is a very old concept, part of the treasure of ancient Japanese wisdom, and thereby part of perennial science.

Once I got familiar with this knowledge tradition, I found a number of other books about hado, as for example sending out hado by deliberate intent for healing, or learning the hado of cooking. Myself a passionate chef, I always wondered how it is possible that two people using the same recipe, and the same kitchen for cooking the same food can end up with cooking food that tastes differently. While the dish may even look the same, the taste is different. Continue reading